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The succulent leaves of peperomia plants indicate that the plants don't need frequent watering to maintain vigor. Allow the moss ball to dry out between waterings. Keeping the peperomia on the dry side is better than saturating it, which leads to root rot and fungus gnat problems.

Water frequency: ​Every 10 to 14 days. Less frequently during the winter.

Place the kokedama in a bowl, plant side up. Add water at room temperature until the kokedama is about to float. Wait about 5 minutes until the kokedama absorbs most of the water in the bowl. Add more water to the bowl, this time a little bit more, and wait until the kokedama looks wet all the way to the neck. Add more water to the bowl as necessary. This process will take about 15 to 30 minutes. Take the kokedama out of the bowl and let it drip the excess water for about a minute before putting back on display.

Note: We use rainwater. If you use tap water, we recommend letting a bucket of water seat outside for at least 8 hours at daylight while the chlorine evaporates. You can also use bottled water or distilled water.

Light:

Peperomia plants need medium to bright light to maintain their vibrant foliage colors. Morning light and filtered light is fine, as well as 12 to 16 hours of artificial light. Insufficient light will result in fewer leaves, leaf drop, and drab coloration. Direct sun rays should be avoided, as it can burn the leaves.
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Feeding/Fertilizing:

When it comes to fertilizing your peperomia plants, less is more. Discolored or dropping leaves are usually a sign of inadequate light or excessive watering, not poor nutrition. As a slow-growing epiphyte, the peperomia can go its entire life without supplemental fertilizer, getting what it needs from its planting media.
 

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